22.8 C
Newcastle
Tuesday, January 26, 2021

Quiz the new weight loss tool, say CSIRO

If you want to lose weight in 2021, a quiz is what you need, according to the CSIRO.

Releasing its new Start Strong Diet Quiz, the global group touted as Australia’s national science research agency believes it has produced this year’s top weight management tool.

Offering a free personalised tool aimed at helping Australians understand their diet mindset into the new year, the quiz assesses participants’ values and readiness for change.

Behavioural scientists at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) have designed a set of questions designed to tap into a person’s passions, motivations, aspirations and readiness for change to help them kick start a weight loss program.

Accessible on mobile devices, the quiz is the result of an analysis of 11,000 CSIRO Total Wellbeing Diet members.

The quiz assesses what motivates individuals to make healthy changes to their lifestyle.

Whether they are more motivated to change their diet, increase their exercise or monitor their measurements, the quiz provides practical tips based on lifestyle choices, passions and aspirations to help participants personalise their weight loss plan.

CSIRO behavioural scientist Dr Emily Brindal said understanding people’s reasons for starting a formal weight loss program was critical to help them stay committed once the New Year’s resolutions have waned.

“‘New year, new me’ resolutions can often be spur-of-the-moment, and we all know that, despite best intentions, motivation levels often drop as challenges present,” she explained.

“The Start Strong Diet Quiz has been developed to help Australians take stock of their mindset and provide prompts to boost their motivation for diet and exercise, ensuring they can enter their weight loss program with the key information they need when losing weight and improving their health in 2021.”

According to CSIRO research, most people begin a diet with high levels of motivation and commitment to lose weight.

Among its members, 93 per cent were motivated to lose weight to feel good and improve their quality of life with health inspiring 89 per cent.

Most people who were classified as obese were encouraged to lose weight for their health (92 per cent).

About 41 per cent of this group were motivated by their family, while trigger events such as a wedding or a death motivated 19 per cent, which is almost double the number of people classed as normal weight who were interested by a trigger event.

Being recommended to lose weight by someone in their lives, such as a doctor, was six times more likely to be a reason for people classed as obese.

The CSIRO, whose problem-solving accomplishments include faster wi-fi, plastic bank notes, extended wear contact lenses and Aerogard, claim its latest invention will provide a motivational map to guide those seeking to improve their overall health and wellbeing in 2021.